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    Book Review: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot — The Curvature

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    Henrietta Lacks was a poor black woman, a tobacco farmer. She knew that something was wrong when she went to seek health care at the free “colored” ward of John Hopkins Hospital. She was diagnosed with a highly aggressive cervical cancer, and during her treatment — without her consent or knowledge — they cut out a piece of her. The cancer cells they cut are still alive today, are growing as I write this, are growing as you read it, are being bought, being sold, and being used for so many different kinds of research, I doubt there’s anyone who could name them all.

    Henrietta Lacks died an excruciatingly painful death in 1951. And her cells have helped to develop seemingly endless medical advancements since then, and continue to develop them now. But just like Henrietta Lacks was never told that they cut out a piece of her cervix, her family was never told that here cells were still alive. The Lacks family only learned through a long series of events over 20 years later. Though those cells have made billions of dollars for various companies — both directly through the selling of HeLa to researchers, and indirectly through the selling of medicines and treatments HeLa has been integral in developing — they have not made a cent for the Lacks family. Indeed, at the time the book was written, many of Henrietta’s children and grandchildren continued to struggle financially, and several did not have health insurance to access the care that only exists because their mother and grandmother died.

    The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, written by Rebecca Skloot and released in 2010, is about all of this.

    Tags Rebecca Skloot the immortal life of henrietta lacks crown publishers nonfiction book reviews reblog

    Reblogged from approximately infinite universe 

    keeleymangeno:

To make a long story short: I HIGHLY recommend this book, The Story Sisters. I first read an Alice Hoffman novel when a friend and I realized our favorite movie Practical Magic (starring Sandra Bullock and Nicole Kidman) was actually based on her novel: Practical Magic. That was good, but this is better! Intense. Gritty. Heart-wrenching. Addicting. What could be better? 

    keeleymangeno:

    To make a long story short: I HIGHLY recommend this book, The Story Sisters. I first read an Alice Hoffman novel when a friend and I realized our favorite movie Practical Magic (starring Sandra Bullock and Nicole Kidman) was actually based on her novel: Practical Magic. That was good, but this is better! Intense. Gritty. Heart-wrenching. Addicting. What could be better? 

    Tags reblog alice hoffman The Story Sisters Practical Magic Sandra Bullock Nicole Kidman

    Reblogged from K.Mangeno 

    At the first of many pit stops, San Diego police officers working security danced with the ladies waiting in long lines at pink Porta-Pottys. Breast humor was everywhere. Pins stitched like baseballs: SAVE SECOND BASE! Scrawled on the back of a minivan: THESE BOOBS ARE MADE FOR WALKING! On a sandwich board: STOP THE WAR IN MY RACK!


    Nancy G. Brinker - Promise Me: How a Sister's Love Launched the Global Movement to End Breast Cancer

    Promise Me:
    How a Sister’s Love Launched the Global Movement to End Breast Cancer
    by Nancy G. Brinker

    (via elana centor)

    Tags reblog promise me nancy g. brinker susan komen breast cancer quotes memoir nonfiction crown archetype biography

    Reblogged from Kindle Quotes